Moor wool

Keeping it real, and real local, is where it’s at, for me at least. Trying to, anyway. So any trip involves seeking out the LYS not to add to my already bulging stash of big-name labels but to look for small-scale and/or locally produced wools.

So when in Hebden Bridge I advise a trip to Ribbon Circus where can be found an extremely fondleable supply of Brigantia Luxury Yarns, some of which left the shop with me for home petting.

They are not, in my humble opinion, making enough of the fact that this is a Hebden Bridge product – shorn from happy sheep clearly visible munching across the moors above the town and spun in nearby Bradford. But then I’m a Londoner (of, I feel compelled to note every time Yorkshire is mentioned, solid Lancashire root-stock) to whom such things are worthy of note whereas for Yorkshire people wool is, well, wool.

I was also excited by the discovery that the primary activity of Brigantia Yarns parent company, Jacksons of Hebden Bridge Ltd, is the production of kits to make embroidered church kneelers. Having spent many a productive hour with my arse on a tapestry meditation cushion on retreat I have a great affection for the twinning of the stitched with the spirit.

I’d be interested to know when and why the company started producing knitting wool in addition to embroidery yarn. Because I want the answer to be that it was in response to the growing number of people like me who want to support the native and the local. Has this been helped by the internet giving the facility to sell to individuals globally therefore requiring less time and money on distribution, outlets etc. The growing popularity of knitting itself goes without saying, of course.

The two skeins are the colours chosen by my two hostesses. The theory is that each will become a hat before being returned to their place of origin. Since winter is quite a long way away that doesn’t seem too unreasonable an aspiration, even for me!

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